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Homesteading … a growing trend.

Whether you’re new to homesteading or you’re a professional homesteader, what you may not know is how much of a trend homesteading has become in recent years. As society becomes more focused on technological living, millennials have taken a step back and are embracing the more natural way of living.

Millennials are the generation that has grown up with technology and social influences all around them since they were very young. You would think a generation growing up with all of the technological advancements would keep them within that world. However, they want to be connected to the environment rather than their phones or the internet.

homesteading trend

Perhaps the interest in homesteading sprung from social media. Millennials have major lifestyle envy — they see people their age or even younger living the best lives through Instagram.

While many of those Instagram lifestyles include vacationing to exotic places, those influencers who are homesteading have caught millennials’ attention all the more. That could be a significant reason why homesteading is a growing trend among millennials.

What Exactly Is Homesteading? 

Homesteading is quite simply living off the land in a self-sufficient way. This can take many forms, but millennials see it as connecting with the land rather than solely connecting online.

Running a small scale farm is just one way to homestead. You could have a few cows, some chickens and a full garden. On the other hand, you might just have a few small gardens and a handful of chickens. Either way, when you choose to homestead, you’re lessening your environmental impact. Some homesteaders even decide to go entirely off the grid by capturing rainwater and using solar panels for electricity and energy.

Every time you choose to grow your own food and self-sustain, you minimize your carbon footprint. A majority of people depend on industrial-sized farms and supermarkets for their needs. Even if you have a small space, you can make the most of it and can live off of what you create and grow.

It’s Eco-Friendly

Millennials are a generation that grew up in technology. However, they’re one of the first generations in a long time that genuinely care about the environment and environmental issues.

Climate change is one of the biggest drivers for millennials who choose to homestead. They look to reduce their carbon footprint and to actively do something about it.

Millennials tend to grasp climate change more than previous generations. Rather than being a consumer of all things that contribute to climate change, millennials who homestead want to be producers and consumers of their own products. That’s why many choose to plant many gardens, forage and care for their own livestock.

 Whether you're new to homesteading or you're a professional homesteader, what you may not know is how much of a trend homesteading has become in recent years.

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It’s Not Just About Giving Up Technology

Although homesteaders don’t fully rely on technology, that doesn’t mean they don’t use it. Many millennial homesteaders use social media as a platform to share their stories. Additionally, homesteaders miles away can connect and share tips and tricks.

Blogging is popular among those who homestead. Hearing from more advanced homesteaders allows new ones to gain insight, and it makes it easier for those who are just starting. Having inspiration in anything helps when you have a goal like living sustainably.

You can still live a simple, genuine life and be part of the generation you grew up in. So many homesteaders actually live in an urban setting, growing their urban gardens or window-box herbs. They’re still fully connected to their generation, all while being connected to the earth.

Have You Found a Home in Homesteading?

Homesteading certainly won’t appeal to everyone. It’s a lifestyle choice that includes some removal from the ever-fast-advancing technological world. There are ways to live off the land, though, and still be involved in the online community.

As more millennials jump on this homesteading train, it means more people are hoping to live an environmentally-conscious lifestyle.

This blog post was provided by Jane, Editor-in-Chief of Environment.co. She is passionate about sustainability, gardening and homesteading.

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