hen life makes a complete circle here on the farm …it’s time to make beef bone broth. Our freezer is once again full of grass-fed beef and with it always comes plenty of beef bones for beef broth.  It’s one of the many staples I always like to have on hand. It’s easy to make I don’t mind at all spending a few hours preparing it for a great tasting homemade beef bone broth.

how to freeze beef bone broth

Simple step-by-step instructions:

bake soup bones

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Lightly coat a baking sheet with olive oil.
In a single layer place soup bones on a baking sheet.
Lightly sprinkle soup bones with salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
Bake for 1 hour.

simmer beef broth

After removing bones from baking sheet, deglaze the pan with hot water, scraping the bottom of the pan for browned particles. Add deglazed particles to large stock pot.
In same large stock pot add; bones, onion, carrots, celery, garlic, bay leaves, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper, garlic powder.
Cover with water.
Bring to a boil and then simmer for 2 hours.

beef bone broth

Strain vegetables from broth and let cool to room temperature and freeze in quart jars. (See instructions below)

How to freeze beef bone broth:

I always store my homemade broths in the freezer.  It saves me time from having to dig out the pressure canner every time I need to make a batch of bone broth. It’s quick and easy to pull a jar out in the morning to thaw when I need broth for a supper meal.

  1. Cool beef broth to room temperature.
  2. Leave a small layer of fat in broth to create a seal between lid and broth.
  3. Using clean quart size canning jars fill jars 3/4 full. Leave more than enough room for the broth to expand when it freezes.
  4. Once all of the jars are filled, wipe jars down with a clean cloth, paying particular attention to threads around the jar.
  5. Dry threads completely before placing lids on jars. Use solid tops and not two-piece banded lids.  Hidden moisture here can cause breakage later on when the liquid freezes and expands.
  6. Place the jars in the freezer, with ample space between each jar so that there is no chance of condensation forming between jars that could potentially freeze the jar to the surface.

Beef Bone Broth
Simple rich beef broth recipe.
Print
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
3 hr
Total Time
3 hr 15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
3 hr
Total Time
3 hr 15 min
Ingredients
  1. Approximately 5 pounds beef bone with meat
  2. 1 1/2 whole onions, skins left on
  3. 2 cups chopped carrots
  4. 2 cups chopped celery
  5. 2 teaspoons chopped garlic
  6. 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  7. 2 teaspoons pepper
  8. 1 teaspoon salt
  9. 3 bay leaves
  10. Water to cover all ingredients.
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Lightly coat a baking sheet with olive oil.
  3. In a single layer place soup bones on a baking sheet.
  4. Lightly sprinkle soup bones with salt & pepper.
  5. Bake for 1 hour.
  6. After removing bones from baking sheet, deglaze the pan with hot water, scraping the bottom of the pan for browned particles. Add deglazed particles to large stock pot.
  7. In same large stock pot add; bones, onion, carrots, celery, garlic, bay leaves, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper.
  8. Cover with water.
  9. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 2 hours.
  10. Strain vegetables from broth and let cool to room temperature and freeze in quart jars.
How to freeze beef bone broth
  1. temperature.
  2. 2. Leave a small layer of fat in broth to create a seal between lid and broth.
  3. 3. Using clean quart size canning jars fill jars 3/4 full with broth. Leave more than enough room for the broth to expand when it freezes.
  4. 4. Once all of the jars are filled, wipe jars down with a clean cloth, paying particular attention to threads around the jar. Dry threads completely before placing lids on jars. Use solid tops and not two-piece banded lids. Hidden moisture here can cause breakage later on when the liquid freezes and expands.
  5. 5. Place the jars in the freezer, with ample space between each jar so that there is no chance of condensation forming between jars that could potentially freeze the jar to the surface.
Our Simple Homestead http://oursimplehomestead.com/

Tracy Lynn

 

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